World Literature Class Learns Yoga

Seniors+Alyssa+Chavez+and+Jenna+Freeman+follow+directions+from+a+beginner%27s+yoga+video.
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World Literature Class Learns Yoga

Seniors Alyssa Chavez and Jenna Freeman follow directions from a beginner's yoga video.

Seniors Alyssa Chavez and Jenna Freeman follow directions from a beginner's yoga video.

Seniors Alyssa Chavez and Jenna Freeman follow directions from a beginner's yoga video.

Seniors Alyssa Chavez and Jenna Freeman follow directions from a beginner's yoga video.

Dayna Lawson, Adviser

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After reading an ancient Indian epic poem about Indian intellectual and spiritual tradition, Ms. Valerie Litts’s Dual Credit English 2332 classes learn yoga. The class covers world literature up to 1650.
“We just finished reading excerpts from Bhagavad Gita, which encourages yoga practice in order to release the mind,” Litts said. “I wanted to expose the students to basic yoga to connect the story to the real world and help the students de-stress.”
According to Ancient History Encyclopedia,  Bhagavad Gita is considered an important Hindu text, which was translated from Sanskrit into English around 1795 by Sir Charles Wilkins. The name Bhagavad Gita means “the song of the Lord.”
“Before I was stressed and my back hurt because I sit in a desk all day,” senior Austin Scott said. “It was nice to stretch and move around. Now my back hurts less, and I am not as stressed.”
 
Yoga has been around for over 5,000 years. While yoga does burn calories and tones muscles, WebMD states that “it’s a total mind-body workout that combines strengthening and stretching poses with deep breathing and meditation or relaxation.”
“My muscles felt very tight and I felt stressed and jittery at the beginning of class,” senior Jenna Freeman said. “Afterwards, because I worked the muscles and area that usually don’t get worked, I feel loose and flowy, very peaceful.”