Assembly Demonstrates Positive Police Interaction

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Assembly Demonstrates Positive Police Interaction

Chief Runnels speaks to MHS Student Body

Chief Runnels speaks to MHS Student Body

Photo by Dayna Lawson

Chief Runnels speaks to MHS Student Body

Photo by Dayna Lawson

Photo by Dayna Lawson

Chief Runnels speaks to MHS Student Body

Leah Mock and Colin Jones

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The Community Safety Education Act assembly was held at 9:45 a.m. on Tues., Jan. 8, the first day of the second semester, in the competition gymnasium. The assembly lasted an hour, during which a sixteen minute educational video was shown.

“Educating the youth is the best place to start,” French teacher Lisa Foster said. “The assembly definitely made me more aware of procedures that will make everyone safer.”

The Texas Community Safety Education Act, effective August 27, 2018 and adopted by the State Board of Education, requires school districts to inform high school students of proper interactions with law enforcement officers during traffic stop encounters.

“I think that it’s important for people to know how to be respectful to an officer and to be prepared by having everything you need,” senior Lourdes Valero said.

The video showed a series of correct and incorrect responses to being pulled over from an officer’s point of view.

“I didn’t realize how often the police get shot at when they pull people over,” freshman James Custer said. “There are severe consequences if you act dangerous or mess around.”

Completion of the course, shown on a student’s official transcript, is required for graduation for any student who enters grade 9 on or after the 2018-2019 school year.

“It’s funny that it’s required for graduation,” senior Cody Cockroft said. “If someone had a 4.0 GPA, they couldn’t graduate because they missed the assembly.”

Students like senior Matthew Allen and senior Daniel Seabolt said the assembly was based on common sense.

“It’s sad that society has stooped to the level that we need an assembly to figure out how to deal with authority,” Seabolt said.

Sophomore Ayeka Potter said she felt the assembly was necessary.

“I definitely feel more prepared to interact with officers,” sophomore Ayeka Potter said. “It makes sense. They just want to make sure we know how to respond.”